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Sponsor & Exhibitor Opportunities

Vicki Sanders
415-947-6107
vsanders@techweb.com

Media Sponsor Opportunities

Liliana Arancibia
415-947-6179
larancibia@cmp.com

Press/Media Inquiries

confpr@oreilly.com

or

Natalia Wodecki
415-947-6762
NWodecki@cmp.com

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Annalee Newitz

Annalee Newitz
writer and analyst, io9

Website

Annalee Newitz is a writer who covers the social impact of technology and science. She contributes to Wired, Popular Science, and New Scientist, and writes the syndicated column Techsploitation. She is co-editor of the book She’s Such a Geek, a former policy analyst at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and currently president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility.

Sessions

Fundamentals
Location: 2002
User-generated censorship is what happens when crowds on social media networks flag content as "inappropriate" and get it removed or hidden. This represents a break with traditional top-down censorship. But is user-generated censorship an improvement, or worse than Big Brother? We'll find out by looking at examples from Flickr, YouTube, Craiglist, and more. Read more.