What to Expect from Browsers in the Next Five Years: A Perspective

Moderated by:
Dion Almaer (Set Direction)
Panelists:
Douglas Crockford (PayPal), Brendan Eich (JavaScript), Ben Galbraith (Google), Alex Russell (Google), Håkon Wium Lie (Opera Software)
Development
Location: New York West
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 27 ratings)

There is no greater time than this to discuss what browsers will look like in the future. We are at a point where the browser is the most important piece of software you will ever use and it is moving to platforms other than just your desktop: in places like your mobile device, your TV, your game console and even your refrigerator.

As browser technology advances and with the emergence of so many competitors what new innovations will we see? Will the same players dominate on mobile devices as the ones on desktop? What will be some of the features that will be important for users? Is it speed or security? Or something else? One vision of the future is the browser controlling all your devices: TVs, home automation, microwave, fridge, etc.

Browser makers are taking Web standards more seriously and it will be interesting to watch which specifications will be implemented by who in the coming years– more precisely HTML5, CSS3 and SVG. What kind of advances will we see in rendering engines and JavaScript engines in the next couple of years?

Top players in the browser world come together on one panel to butt heads and predict the future of browsers.

Photo of Dion Almaer

Dion Almaer

Set Direction

Dion Almaer is the founder of a brand new company named Set Direction where he has the pleasure of working with Ben Galbraith. The pair co-founded Ajaxian.com together and they are now focused on helping developers deliver fantastic experiences and working to set the direction of the software industry as a whole.

Dion has been a technologist and a developer writing Web applications since it took over from Gopher. He has been fortunate enough to speak around the world, has published many articles, a book, and of course covers life the universe and everything on his blog at almaer.com/blog.

He has been called a human aggregator, and you can see that in full force if you follow him on Twitter @dalmaer.

Photo of Douglas Crockford

Douglas Crockford

PayPal

Douglas Crockford is best known for having discovered that there are good parts in JavaScript—an important and unexpected development. He also discovered the JSON data-interchange format, the world’s best-loved data format, and various JavaScript tools, such as JSLint and JSMin. He works at PayPal.

Photo of Brendan Eich

Brendan Eich

JavaScript

Brendan Eich was founder and long-term CTO at Mozilla. He also served as SVP of engineering and briefly as CEO. Brendan is widely recognized for his enduring contributions to the Internet revolution. In 1995, he invented JavaScript (ECMAScript), the Internet’s most widely used programming language. He cofounded the Mozilla.org project in 1998, serving as chief architect, and has been a board member of the Mozilla Foundation since its inception in 2003. Brendan helped launch the award-winning Firefox web browser in November 2004 and Thunderbird email client in December 2004.

Brendan holds a BS in math and computer science from Santa Clara University and an MS in computer science from the University of Illinois.

Photo of Ben Galbraith

Ben Galbraith

Google

Ben Galbraith is the head of product and developer relations for Google’s Developer Product Group. Prior to Google, Ben has alternated between entrepreneurial and executive roles across companies in many industries, such as Mozilla, Palm / HP, and Walmart. He lives in Palo Alto with his wife and eight children.

Photo of Alex Russell

Alex Russell

Google

Alex Russell is a Staff Software Engineer on Chrome team at Google where he designs new features for the Web Platform and leads Chrome’s Standards work. He’s a member of ECMA TC39 , the committee standardizing JavaScript, and is an elected member of the W3C’s Technical Architecture Group where he works to improve the state of API design for the web.

His recent projects include Web Components, ES6 features including Classes and Promises, and Service Workers. Previously he helped build Chrome Frame and led the Dojo Toolkit project. Alex plays for Team Web.

Photo of Håkon Wium Lie

Håkon Wium Lie

Opera Software

Håkon Wium Lie joined Opera in 1999 as the Chief Technology Officer. Prior to his position at Opera, Wium Lie worked for W3C, where he proposed the concept of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

After receiving his Master’s degree from MIT Media Lab, Wium Lie worked as a research scientist at Norwegian Telecom Research and later at CERN, the birthplace of the Web. From 1995 to 1999, Wium Lie worked for W3C, after which he joined Opera. He has also received a PhD degree from the University of Oslo in 2006.

In 1999, Technology Review included him on the TR100 list, “a group of one hundred young innovators in technology from around the world”. Wium Lie was also honored by the World Economic Forum (WEF) as one of the “Technology Pioneers” in 2000 and 2001.

In his spare time, Wium Lie enjoys spending time with his family, listening to classical music, painting, driving his electric car and fighting advertising. He currently resides in Oslo, Norway.

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Sponsors
  • IBM
  • Microsoft
  • Rackspace Hosting
  • 3DVIA
  • Authorize.Net
  • HP
  • Neustar, Inc.
  • OpenSRS
  • open{subnet}

Rob Koziura
(415) 947-6111
rkoziura@techweb.com

Kaitlin Pike
(415) 947-6306
kpike@techweb.com

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